I Love Latkes!

When I was kid, I would beg my mom to make latkes. I had no idea these fried potato pancakes had anything to do with Hanukkah. I just knew they were delicious! Deep frying foods in oil is a tradition during The Festival of Lights, but latkes can be enjoyed year round in so many mouthwatering ways - as a base for a perfectly fried egg at breakfast to a side with dinner or as a versatile passed party food. This recipe was passed down through generations to Alonna, one of my editors. While the traditional accompaniments are applesauce and sour cream, I added a modern twist with three new topping ideas.

Clinton Kelly Latkes


  • 1 ½ lbs. Idaho potatoes, 2 large potatoes or 4 medium potatoes
  • 1 large yellow onion, grated
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 2 tbsp. matzoh meal or flour
  • Kosher salt & fresh black pepper to taste
  • 6 tbsp. canola oil, plus more as needed


  • Fill a large bowl with cold water. Peel potatoes and place finished ones in cold water to prevent browning.
  • Cut potatoes lengthwise into quarters small enough to fit into food processor. Shred potatoes into thin strips – but not mush, then place in large mixing bowl. Cut onion in quarters and add to food processor. (You can also use a hand grater for the potatoes and onions. If so, transfer shredded potatoes and onion into clean kitchen towel to squeeze out moisture. They must be completely dry.) Place the dry potato & onion mixture into a large mixing bowl.
  • Add egg, matzoh meal, salt and pepper. Mix well.
  • Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat.
  • When oil is fully heated, drop 6 tablespoons of mixture into pan. Pat down and flatten each with a spatula or spoon. Don’t crowd the pan.
  • Fry for 4 to 5 minutes on each side or until golden and crisp around the edges.
  • Remove from pan and place on plate covered with a paper towel. Repeat, adding more oil as needed, until all mixture is used.
  • Latkes can be reheated on a foil-line baking sheet at 400°F until warmed through.


Jazz up your latkes! Instead of sour cream, use a tart, plain Greek yogurt or labane, a type of sheep’s milk-based “yogurt cheese” popular in the Middle East. It’s creamy, tangy and all sorts of delicious. Place a dollop of yogurt onto each crispy latke and top with one of these three combinations:

Pomegranate seeds.

These sweet little jewels not only look exotic but they create a powerful flavor combination with the piquant yogurt and salty latke.

Roasted lemon slices and fresh mint leaves.

Slice a lemon, into extremely thin rounds, place them on a foil-lined pan, drizzle with olive oil, add a pinch of Kosher salt and broil on high until just browned. Place a slice on each latke along with one or two pieces of mint.

Red onion, cucumber, olive oil and za’atar.

Dice onion and slice small chunks of English cucumber. Combine in a bowl with olive oil and Kosher salt and pepper to taste. The true hero of this dish is the za’atar (ZAH-tar), a staple in Israeli and Middle Eastern cooking. It’s a blend of equal parts thyme, sumac, sesame seeds, Kosher salt and pepper. Sometimes oregano and cumin are added. You can find it in specialty stores or make your own. I guarantee you will soon be marinating your chicken in it and adding the mixture to your meatballs.

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When you're walking home from work on a beautiful fall evening and you think, "A delicious cappuccino would make my life complete right now." Then you realize it's 5:00 and you're too old for that shit.

You know what's awesome? When you're super-excited to meet someone and she turns out to be just as smart and sweet and chic as you hoped she'd be. That's Danai Gurira, whom you might know as Michonne on The Walking Dead! Tune into @abcthechew tomorrow to see us have some fun in the kitchen! #twd #thechew #fanboy

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